Healthcare leaders

Healthcare workers are the backbone of any primary care system. We aim to reach 25,000 healthcare workers by 2025 through training and mentoring. We are also investing in local leadership to create diverse networks of primary healthcare champions and leaders around the world.

“Healthcare leaders need knowledge, skills, attitudes and tools. PCI have got all of that. I think PCI’s plan with regards to the support of local leaderships is really, really important for the health system.” (Dr Ghassan Karem, MoH, Libya)

  • Dr Osama Saidoun, Libya

    Osama participated in training as part of our EU-funded project with IRC in Libya:

    Dr Osama Saidoun, Libya

    Osama participated in training as part of our EU-funded project with IRC in Libya:

    “The key advantages of the recent digital training from PCI were the comprehensive content, and the discussion sessions (webinars) carried out through Zoom with excellent professional trainers in terms of knowledge and performance. Any training at present is challenging due to both the demands around COVID-19 and the ongoing unstable situation of our country. Overall, the online learning experience was new and wonderful for me. As a result of the training, I already started to better support patients with End Stage Renal Disease – and will be adapting the way I manage patients with chronic diseases. I also feel that my communication skills improved a lot.”

  • Miata Johnson, Tanzania

    Miata, Nurse and Public Health Officer with UNHCR, was part of a cohort of primary care clinicians we supported on managing NCDs in refugee settings:

    Miata Johnson, Tanzania

    Miata, Nurse and Public Health Officer with UNHCR, was part of a cohort of primary care clinicians we supported on managing NCDs in refugee settings:

    “Following training with PCI we established a clinic for diabetes in the camp. From the Training of Trainer method, clinicians were able to cascade training to other staff. This means we can reach many more healthcare staff and therefore more patients. Now, running the diabetes programme – and broader NCD programmes – we are able to factor in what is needed with broader planning with partners: identify the gaps and what needs to be done.”

    Read more about her experience.

  • Dr Mawaheb Shelli, Libya

    Mawaheb was trained as a mentor as part of our EU-funded project with IRC in Libya:

    Dr Mawaheb Shelli, Libya

    Mawaheb was trained as a mentor as part of our EU-funded project with IRC in Libya:

    “This project engages health workers from small primary health facilities and invests in them to reach their full potential. As a mentor I have supported health workers from the Ministry of Health in delivering ‘cascade training’ with their colleagues. Attending the PCI run mentor-workshop really helped bring all the pieces together. Next steps for me are to continue to support the guidance and care pathways being implemented across the pilot sites.”

    Read more about Mawaheb’s experience

  • Dr Edilu Robert, Uganda

    Robert Edilu was PCI’s first NCD ‘champion’ within the UNHCR programme:

    Dr Edilu Robert, Uganda

    Robert Edilu was PCI’s first NCD ‘champion’ within the UNHCR programme:

    “Equipped with all the diverse knowledge and experiences obtained through training and support from PCI team and colleagues, I went out into the world to mentor, treat, establish functional systems and to monitor and evaluate the implementation of NCD care at the various refugee settlements where I worked.”

    Read more about Robert’s experience